Climate Week Best Campaign 2012

Cambridge

cambridgejulian.jpg"I am in support of the Close the Door campaign and their work to ensure that retailers keep their doors closed when using energy for climate control inside shops. Heating or cooling the street is just not acceptable at a time when we have to pay serious attention to avoiding energy waste.

Results from an independent research project in the University of Cambridge, published autumn 2010, demonstrate that energy wasted through open store doors is significant . Closing the door, just as we all do at home when using heating or air conditioning, is easy and effective. Hundreds of shops in Cambridge alone already now follow this practice without any adverse effect on profit. Indeed they are saving on their energy bills and reducing shoplifting - costs that would otherwise add to the price of goods or reduce profits.

The Close the Door campaign started in Cambridge and is a great example of many exciting initiatives that come out of this region. Please follow me in supporting the campaign whether you use shops as a consumer or work in them. Close the Store Door – it’s that simple."
Julian Huppert MP (Lib Dem) Cambridge (pictured to right in photo)

The Close the Door campaign was set up in Cambridge by Jeannie Dawkins, Margaret Mair and Sian Reid with the support of the City Council. At the outset 8 shops were in the campaign, growing to over 500 of all types and sizes. All shops were visited for a comprehensive update  before Christmas 2011, the next full survey is planned for winter 2013/14.

Please contact the Cambridge campaign at cambridge@closethedoor.org.uk

In 2009/10 the Esmee Fairburn Foundation most generously funded an independent research project within Cambridge University Engineering Department on the statistics around energy loss through open doors so that the campaign could work with reliable hard data. The work was carried out using retail outlets in the city. 

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Cambridge City Council supports the Close the Door campaign. Initial funding for the Cambridge campaign came from Cambridge City Council and has been used for producing print materials. All other work has been contributed on a voluntary basis.